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Faith & Religion

Why do theology?

From Kathryn Tanner’s article a year or so ago, something to think about…

Theologians are now primarily called to provide not a theoretical argument for Christianity’s plausibility, but an account of how Christianity can be part of the solution—rather than part of the problem—on matters that make a life-and-death difference to people, especially the poor and the oppressed. (p.40)

See: Tanner, Kathryn. “Christian claims: how my mind has changed.” Christian Century 127, no. 4 (February 23, 2010): 40-45.

3 Comments

  1. Amen, but I’m a little troubled by the “now”; though the apologetic imposition has often constituted a good deal of theology’s activity, has it ever been it’s “primary <i.calling“? Couldn’t this be better presented, not as a change of direction, but as a return to theology’s deepest roots?

  2. Sue

    There is now more theology being either written and studied than ever before.
    There are more Christians in the world than ever before.
    There are more Christian missionaries in the world than ever before
    There are more Bibles in the world than ever before.
    There is more Christian literature of all kinds in the world than ever before. Plus a cornucopia of Christian electronica – radio, TV, CD’s and DVD’s and of course the internet.
    And yet the world is becoming more insane every day.
    Some of the leading-edge (and therefore dangerous) vectors of this now global insanity are right-wing Christians, both “catholic” and Protestant.

  3. Sue

    If Jesus happened to re-appear would he or she be found anywhere near these talks or lectures?
    Would he/she be recognized, and thus welcome, if he/she happened to wander in through the front door?
    Remembering that the original Jesus was MOST unwelcome to the then in power ecclesiastical establishment. They consented and conspired to have him executed.
    Yale (an Ivy League college) is of course the pinnacle of the ecclesiastical establishment in the USA.

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